Hue Imperial City

Hue Imperial City

Hue Imperial City of Vietnam

Famously being one of Vietnam’s seven UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the Imperial City of Hue has long been a must-see attraction for tourists visiting a hidden charm of Vietnam.

Famously being one of Vietnam’s seven UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the Imperial City of Hue has long been a must-see attraction for tourists visiting a hidden charm of Vietnam. The Imperial City of Hue was actually a walled fortress and palace belonged to the ancient city of Hue which was a capital city of the Nguyen Dynasty for 140 years date back from 1805 until 1945.

The grandeur architecture was planned to be built in 1803 by Gia Long – an emperor who founded the Nguyen Dynasty. During 27 years from 1805 to 1832, the Imperial City of Hue was finally completed under the reign of Minh Mang, making it the most massive structure being built in the history of modern Vietnam involving thousands of workers, millions cubic meters of rock and huge volume of burden workload. It locates on the northern bank of Huong River, turning South with total land area of 520 ha. The place was made UNESCO Site in 1993 with the remained buildings being actively restored and preserved after the destruction from the Vietnam War.

The Imperial City of Hue has a circumference of 10 kilometers with the height of 6.6 meters and 21 meters thick with forts being meanderingly arranged, accompanied by cannons, artilleries and ammunitions. Initially the fortress was built solely by soil, only to be replaced by bricks afterward. Surrounding the city is the complicated canal system served not only as a protection but also as a waterway with nearly seven kilometers.

There are total of ten main majestic gates leading to the Imperial City of Hue, which can be divided into two main parts excluding houses and mansions: The Citadel and The Forbidden City. The former served to protect the important palaces inside while the latter was where the emperor and the royal family stayed as well as the court’s workplace. All the typically traditional Eastern architectures including majestic palaces, tombs and museums stand together to make an utmost amusing attraction right in the heart of Vietnam.

Hue’s Imperial City covers an area of more than 500 hectares (1,235 acres). Hue was the seat of the Nguyen Dynasty from 1802 until the end of feudal Vietnam in 1945.

The citadel was built between 1804 and 1833, serving as a symbol of wealth and power of Vietnam’s last ruling family. The royal walls are the most popular attraction to Hue. Officials have said the citadel will open during summer nights this year for tourists who are discouraged by sunshine during the day.

The royal palace stands next to the Perfume River.

Ngo Mon, or the South Gate, is the main entrance into the citadel.

The city has special areas to hold grand ceremonies, worshiping rituals, houses of the kings’ mothers and grandmothers, as well as classrooms for princes.

The Imperial Household Department, which looked after the royal family’s properties.

The house for the king and his family in the Forbidden City is protected by walls of 3.5 meters (11.5 feet) high.

With more than 100 houses and buildings, the entire city is also well dotted with trees, gardens and ponds.

A bridge connects the royal palace with the rest of Hue.

The imperial city was named a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1993.

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on Mar 20, 2017

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